Walter E. Williams

In August 2009, MSNBC's Contessa Brewer was discussing a tea party rally in Arizona, where it's legal to carry an unconcealed weapon. She said: "A man at a pro-health care reform rally ... wore a semiautomatic assault rifle on his shoulder and a pistol on his hip. ... There are questions about whether this has racial overtones. I mean, here you have a man of color in the presidency and white people showing up with guns." All that her audience was shown were a rifle and pistol strapped to a man's back. MSNBC concealed the fact that the armed man was black and did not show the interview he gave to the reporter. Brewer knowingly deceived her audience because an armed black man didn't fit the racial narrative.

It's not just white liberals in the media who are stirring up racial animosity; they have help from black politicians. During last year's debate on the debt ceiling, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, said that argument over the debt ceiling was proof of racial animosity toward Obama. Rep. Andre Carson, D-Ind., said the tea party wishes to lynch blacks and hang them from trees. Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., said Perry's job creation in Texas is "one stage away from slavery." While appearing on MSNBC, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter referred to Trayvon Martin's death as an "assassination." Nutter had better worry about the 118 "assassinations" in Philadelphia so far this year.

To their own detriment -- and that of the nation -- black people are being used to further the liberal big-government agenda. Black people have been misled to think that their problems are with white people and government and that black politicians are the solution. There's not a speck of evidence supporting either vision -- despite the election of a white African as president.


Walter E. Williams

Dr. Williams serves on the faculty of George Mason University as John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics and is the author of 'Race and Economics: How Much Can Be Blamed on Discrimination?' and 'Up from the Projects: An Autobiography.'
 
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