Walter E. Williams

At best, such arguments are simply cover for anti-diversity and anti-multiculturalistic attitudes. The overriding principle of the matter is that a white student need not have ever engaged in discrimination to have points deducted and a black student need not have ever been a victim of discrimination to receive the white student's points. This is widely accepted political thinking, plus it's settled law. After all, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, in an affirmative action case now before the U.S. Supreme Court, upheld the constitutionality of University of Michigan's race-based law school admissions policy, agreeing that a race-neutral policy was no way to achieve the state's compelling goal of diversity. Therefore, meritocracy must yield to broader social concerns.

Creating an advantage for one American by creating a disadvantage for another American, based upon race, has become an entrenched feature in our age of racial enlightenment. I'd be very interested in hearing any objections to my new grading procedure from politicians, university administrators and civil-rights experts. Of course, by fall, before my new agenda gets off the ground, the U.S. Supreme Court might rule it unconstitutional.


Walter E. Williams

Dr. Williams serves on the faculty of George Mason University as John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics and is the author of 'Race and Economics: How Much Can Be Blamed on Discrimination?' and 'Up from the Projects: An Autobiography.'
 
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