Travis Weber

As FRC stated in its amicus brief, “religious exercise does not necessarily confine itself to discrete locations, activities, or aspects of participation in the life of a community, but can permeate a person’s daily behavior, from the mundane to the commercial.” There is no debate as to whether the Greens, devout Christians, can provide certain drugs which can destroy human embryos without violating their religion. There is also no debate that many Americans share the Greens’ convictions. The only open question in this case is whether the freedom of religion (including the freedom to live and work according to one’s beliefs) or this intrusive federal mandate on family business owners to provide their employees with free drugs and services, to which they morally object, will prevail.

The federal government should not force its citizens to violate their religious beliefs just to freely operate a business in their own country, The Green family will shortly find out whether their government will demand that they do so. The religious liberty of many similar families across the land is likewise hanging on the Court’s decision.


Travis Weber

Travis Weber, J.D., LL.M., is director of the Center for Religious Liberty at the Family Research Council.