Todd Starnes

Religious folks in San Antonio had a similar experience. One professional counselor at a camp run by BCFS, an organization previously known as Baptist Child and Family Services, said there were no clergy at all.

“The clergy needed to be involved with the children,” my source told me. “The children were very spiritual and their spiritual needs were not being cared for.”

My source said a group of counselors urged BCFS to consider bringing in a priest or minister.
“We were turned down,” my source said.

“We had suggested they bring in a priest on Sunday,” the counselor said. “Instead, they had a girl playing a cassette tape of Christian songs. They denied those kids the opportunity to be with a minister.”

The counselor said during her entire tenure working at the Lackland Air Force Base camp, she never saw a single minister.

“It was heartbreaking,” the counselor said. “The church needs to become involved. The spiritual needs of these children need to be tended to.”

BCFS tells me they now provide religious services for the children at Lackland. They also said boys and girls are provided a Spanish-language Bible should they desire one.

Back in Tucson, Pastor Coffin said churches have a responsibility to help the children.

“We have a heart to treat immigrants, whether legal or not, with respect,” he said. “It’s not our job to judge whether they came here for legitimate reasons.”

Coffin describes CrossRoads Church as a conservative congregation that has a “huge heart for the poor in our community.”

“I don’t politicize,” he said. “I just teach the Bible.”

That being said, Pastor Coffin believes the government has overstepped its constitutional authority – and is trying to do the work of the church.

“Back in the day, if you were in trouble and poor, the first thing you thought of was going to the church,” he said. “Whether it was for food, clothing, shelter or helping pay bills – the church was the front line. Now, it’s the government who is the front line.”

Pastor Coffin believes it’s time for the church to take back what the government took away.

“We’re not anti-government at all,” he said. “We think the government is equipped to do what they were constitutionally created to do – and not do the church’s job.”

But I’m afraid under this administration, the government believes they are church and President Obama is the deity. Heaven help us all.


Todd Starnes

Todd Starnes is the host of Fox News & Commentary – heard daily on 250+ radio stations. He’s also the author of “Dispatches From Bitter America.” To check out all of his work you can visit his website or follow him on Twitter @toddstarnes. In his spare time, Todd is active in his church, plays golf, follows SEC football, and eats barbecue. He lives in New York City.