Thomas Sowell

Does anyone who thinks that a traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge should attract a governor's attention have any idea how many traffic jams there are on the various highways leading into Manhattan?

The Long Island Expressway, for example, long ago acquired the title, "the world's longest parking lot." Traffic backed up heading into, or out of, the Holland Tunnel or the Lincoln Tunnel is nothing new. My recollections of driving on highways in and around Manhattan include very few memories of free-flowing traffic.

Any governor who devoted his time to looking into traffic jams between New Jersey and New York would have very little time left for doing anything else.

If anything good comes out of this shabby episode of political vindictiveness by Governor Christie's staffers, it showed what a skewed sense of perspective most of the media have on what kinds of issues are important. It is not that the media consider traffic jams more important than human lives. But the fact that Christie is the current frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016 -- and is ahead of Hillary Clinton in the polls -- makes him a target for a partisan media.

Given that blatant partisanship, the need for a Republican candidate in 2016 who can make his case to the public, in spite of the media, is especially acute -- even though it is much too early to try to predict who that candidate will be.

Whatever the political fate of Governor Christie, he has provided an example of the kind of articulation that is needed -- indeed, imperative -- if the Republicans are to have any chance of rescuing this country from the ruinous policies of the past few years.


Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institute and author of The Housing Boom and Bust.

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