Thomas Sowell

Vulnerable people, depending on that monthly Social Security check, need to hear that you understand that they paid into Social Security for years when they were working, and that it would be unconscionable to now cheat them out of what they paid for.

Policy wonks already know that nobody in his right mind has proposed any such thing. But, if you depend on the votes of policy wonks to win elections, be prepared to lose in a landslide.

One of the biggest of the election year lies is that Republicans want to sacrifice the poor in order to have "tax cuts for the rich." That would be grossly immoral -- if it were true. Unscrambling the confusion in that argument can involve work. But if people on welfare can be expected to work, surely people running for high office can put in a little work too -- including the work of explaining in plain words what is totally false about the "tax cuts for the rich" argument.

I know it can be done because I have done it. You can see my essay on the subject on my website (www.tsowell.com) under the title "Tax Cuts."

But so long as Republicans don't seem to feel any urgency about refuting the Democrats' claim that they just want to help the rich at the expense of the poor, they are courting defeat on election day. Why lose to a lie because you didn't bother to explain the truth?

Some of the time that was spent at the Republican convention trying to "humanize" Mitt Romney could have been better spent debunking the Democrats' talking points. After all, we are not going to be voting for a Buddy-in-Chief in the White House, but for someone with some clear ideas about what this country needs -- and who is willing to share those ideas with us in plain English.


Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institute and author of The Housing Boom and Bust.

Creators Syndicate