Thomas Sowell

Only after the international aggressions of Mussolini and Hitler during the 1930s made them pariahs did the left start reclassifying fascists as being on the right.

Since this is an election year, there may be more interest than usual in Barack Obama. Best-selling author Shelby Steele's book on Obama, titled "A Bound Man," gives both facts and insights that will take the reader far deeper than most media accounts.

Among my own books, the one that will probably be of the most interest to young people with no knowledge of economics is "Basic Economics." Apparently many people find it easier to understand than most economics books, since it has been translated into six other languages overseas.

My latest book on economics, however, is the recently published "Economic Facts and Fallacies." It looks in-depth at fallacies about such things as housing, income, race, sex discrimination, the economics of academia and the Third World.

Fallacies are not just crazy ideas. Usually they are notions that sound very plausible, which is what enables them to be used by politicians, intellectuals, the media, and all sorts of crusading movements, to advance their causes or their careers.

It is precisely because most of the popular fallacies of our time, which are always especially popular during election years, sound so plausible that we need to stop, before we get swept along by rhetoric, and scrutinize the underlying flaws that turn brilliant-sounding "solutions" into recipes for disaster.


Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institute and author of The Housing Boom and Bust.

Creators Syndicate