Thomas Sowell
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Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld faded away more quickly and more quietly than almost anyone who has been so prominent and so controversial for so many years.

What history will say of him we cannot know because most of us cannot today know all the things that were known within a small inner circle of those who had all the available facts -- and all the weight of responsibility for decisions that had to be made under inescapable uncertainties and dangers.

It is hard to think of any Secretary of Defense who has ever been popular and Donald Rumsfeld certainly did not become a historic first in that department. He did not suffer fools gladly, even though they are a major constituency in Washington.

Whatever history's verdict on the Iraq war and on Secretary Rumsfeld, both deserved to be discussed and debated on a far more serious and responsible level than the media sound bites, political spin and venomous cheap shots which have become all too common.

Whether Donald Rumsfeld's policies were mistaken or not, that is no reason to accept superficial and even gutter-level discourse on momentous national issues. There was a time when even politicians understood that.

When British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain died early in the Second World War that his own blunders brought on and nearly lost, Winston Churchill delivered the eulogy -- even though Churchill had more reason than anyone else to be bitter at Chamberlain, who had turned a deaf ear to all Churchill's warnings for years.

"Neville Chamberlain acted with perfect sincerity," Churchill said. How many people would say that today about a political opponent on an issue as explosive as war and peace?

Churchill said more, that "we are so often mocked by the failure of our hopes and the upsetting of our calculations," but that "however the fates may play, we march always in the ranks of honor" when we have done our best.

Chamberlain's best fell disastrously short but no one could accuse him of doing what he did for selfish or corrupt reasons -- which has become standard operating procedure for many today. That was a different era but we need to become aware of what is possible and how much we have declined from those days.

In the United States, Wendell Wilkie received the largest vote of any Republican candidate for president when he ran against Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1940. But, after the elections were over, he did not spend his time trashing President Roosevelt. He in fact became an emissary from FDR to Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

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Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institute and author of The Housing Boom and Bust.

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