Terry Jeffrey
Daniel and Samuel were both born in Monterrey, Mexico on the same day in 1990 and baptized by the same priest two Sundays later.

Both attended the same primary and secondary schools. Both dreamed of some day moving to the United States. But there the similarity ends.

Samuel dropped out of school in tenth grade. Daniel graduated from secondary school, went on to the university and graduated at the top of his class.

The last time Samuel ever walked through the door of a church is when he walked out of one just after receiving the sacrament of confirmation. Daniel served as an altar boy and attends Mass every Sunday, every holy day and often on other days as well.

After dropping out of school, Samuel held a series of jobs, doing unskilled labor. After graduating from college, Daniel took a teaching job at a local high school and attended graduate school at night, hoping eventually to earn a doctorate in history.

Daniel is habitually honest. In keeping with his religious faith, he would never knowingly break a law unless it was plainly an unjust law -- such as one that required him to discriminate against somebody because of their race or to pay for an abortion.

Daniel -- also because of his fundamental beliefs -- consciously discovered as an adult what he instinctively knew as a child: He was a conservative, who embraced work and family along with his faith.

Samuel was not particularly concerned with any of these things.

At the age of 23, both Samuel and Daniel still dreamed of moving to the United States.

Which of these two hypothetical men would be more likely to illegally cross the U.S. border and illegally work and settle in the United States?

Earlier this year, the Congressional Budget Office prepared a "description" of the immigrant population in the United States for House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan.

According to the CBO, there were 11.5 million "unauthorized" aliens in the United States as of 2011. These did not include large numbers from the Coptic community in Egypt, the Orthodox community in Syria, or from Kenya, South Korea or south Sudan.

But, according to the CBO, 59 percent of the illegal immigrants in the United States were from Mexico, while another 14 percent were from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.

In analyzing the educational attainment of immigrants, the CBO did not distinguish between the legal and the illegal, but it did show a sharp distinction between those from Mexico and Central America and those from elsewhere.


Terry Jeffrey

Terence P. Jeffrey is the editor-in-chief of CNSNews

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