Terry Jeffrey

In his State of the Union last month, President Bush talked about "competitiveness" and "innovation," and pledged to "invest" in an assortment of things.
 
But when you examine what he talked about "investing" in, you begin to suspect that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, the California Democrat, is Bush's investment adviser.

Back on Nov. 15, Pelosi gave a speech laying out the Democratic agenda. It, too, was about "competitiveness," "innovation" and "investments." In fact, she used the word "investment" 10 times to describe what it is the Democrats want to do.

"The future prosperity and competitiveness of America demand that we initiate this sustained and intellectual investment in innovation," she said.

Exactly what type of "investment" was she talking about?

Well, for one, she wants to invest more tax dollars in math and science teachers. "America's greatest resource for innovation and economic growth resides in America's classrooms," she said. So, Democrats want "a qualified teacher in every math and science K-12 classroom."

Secondly, she wants to "double" the tax dollars for science research. "Our agenda will double federal funding for basic research and development in physical sciences," she said.

Thirdly, she wants to spend more tax dollars on alternative energy. Democrats, she said, will spend money to "develop clean, sustainable energy alternatives, such as bio-based fuels, as well as new engine technologies for flex-fuel, hybrid and bio-diesel cars and trucks."

Sound familiar?

In his State of the Union, Bush said, "Tonight I announce the American Competitiveness Initiative, to encourage innovation throughout our economy and to give our nation's children a firm grounding in math and science."

How so?

Well, for one, he wants to invest more tax dollars in math and science teachers. "I propose to train 70,000 high school teachers, to lead advanced placement courses in math and science," he said,

Secondly, he wants to "double" the tax dollars for science research. "I propose to double the federal commitment to the most critical basic research programs in the physical sciences over the next 10 years," he said.

Thirdly, he wants to spend more tax dollars on alternative energy. "To change how we power our homes and offices, we will invest more in zero-emission coal-fired plants; revolutionary solar and wind technologies; and clean, safe nuclear energy," he said. Not to mention "wood chip and stalks or switch grass."


Terry Jeffrey

Terence P. Jeffrey is the editor-in-chief of CNSNews

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