Ted Baehr

Ever since the critical and box office success of movies like Michael Moore’s “Bowling for Columbine” and “Fahrenheit 9/11,” the atheist, left-wing elitists in the mass media have stepped up their attacks on the patriotic, traditional and orthodox values of America and Christianity. Clearly, these people feel threatened by the success of conservative evangelical Christians and other traditionalists in the entertainment industry with such hits like “The Passion of the Christ” and “The Chronicles of Narnia,” not to mention their success in electing George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004.

Not only has there been an increase in the number of explicitly left-wing, anti-American, anti-Christian documentaries in the last two years (such as “The Road to Guantanamo,” “Jesus Camp,” “Jimmy Carter Man from Plains,” and “For the Bible Tells Me So”), but there has also been an increasing number of anti-American and anti-Christian mainstream movies such as “The Da Vinci Code,” “Brokeback Mountain,” and the recent box office bombs “In the Valley of Elah” and “Rendition.”

Two upcoming movies will continue these attacks, Robert Redford’s already outdated propaganda movie against the War in Iraq, “Lions for Lambs,” and a new movie, “The Golden Compass,” based on the first book in secular humanist Philip Pullman’s anti-Christian children’s trilogy, “His Dark Materials.”

Redford’s new movie, which we have seen already, contains a slew of shallow arguments against the Republican Party, the War in Iraq, the Vietnam War, and the United States military, spiced with a vague secular humanist call to political action, presumably against those “evil” conservatives in the Republican Party and their supporters, the so-called religious right.

Pullman’s books not only mock and belittle God, they also attack the Christian Church (labeled “the Church” and “the Magisterium” in the books). In the trilogy, Pullman rejects the orthodox view of God and presents a nebulous, personal and demonic-sounding spirituality with no philosophical roots or ultimate meaning.

Pullman’s world is a sad, animalistic universe. Since this is the only world there is, the trilogy ends in hopelessness. Love is not selfless giving, because that would be useless in a materialistic world. Love instead is the lust of pleasuring each other. In Pullman’s world, there’s no hope of eternal life where the lame and the blind and the deaf and dumb can walk and see and hear and talk, where the old are made youthful, there’s no heavenly banquet, there’s no loving God, there’s no order, and there’s no peace.


Ted Baehr

Dr. Baehr is the founder and Publisher of Movieguide®: A Family Guide to Movies and Entertainment and Chairman of the Christian Film & Television Commission.