Tad DeHaven

Posted June 10, 2013

When it comes to congressional ethics rules, the fox is guarding the henhouse.

Posted June 09, 2013

Rep. Fincher’s inability or unwillingness to remove the plank in his own eye is yet another example of how Republicans are generally lousy at making the case for spending cuts.

Posted June 02, 2013

In addition to doing little to curb the size of government, it does nothing to rein in the federal government’s scope.

Posted May 13, 2013

Last week I discussed the tendency for policymakers to treat the Pentagon like a giant jobs program. It was prompted by an article from the Associated Press on members of Congress shoving unwanted upgraded Abrams tanks down taxpayers’ throats because retooling tanks sustains jobs back in the district.

Posted May 06, 2013

Over the past two years Congress has spent almost a half billion taxpayer dollars—and wants to spend another $436 million—upgrading Abrams tanks that experts and the Army itself say aren’t needed.

Posted April 30, 2013

Although I think both parties deserve equal blame (food stamps are an example), I give Rubio credit for not going along with the standard Republican delusion that Obama lit the torch of government dependency.

Posted April 22, 2013

As I often point out, waste always comes with government the same way a Happy Meal always comes with a toy and drink. There is duplication and waste in the federal government because it has become massive and there are virtually no limits on what politicians can spend money on.

Posted April 08, 2013

The president will apparently propose modest measures to slow the growth in entitlement spending in exchange for more tax increases. That would raise hopes for what the Beltway class likes to refer to as the “grand bargain,” but for those of us who are looking for considerably less government in our lives it would hardly be cause for enthusiasm.

Posted March 30, 2013

The President on Tuesday signed the continuing resolution that funds the government through September and (gasp) keeps the sequester cuts intact. Now that it appears sequestration isn't going away (and yet the earth continues to spin merrily on its axis), the focus should be on how this small step might be extended.

Posted March 18, 2013

More effective (or efficient) government is also what liberals stand for

Posted March 11, 2013

Saturday Night Live’s mocking of the administration’s sky-is-falling posture is a hopeful indication that the anti-spending cuts politicians might have overplayed their hand.

Posted March 03, 2013

Every federal dollar that a state politician can spend is a dollar that he or she doesn’t have to ask his or her voters to part with.

Posted February 22, 2013

Many of these areas have been covered by Cato’s Downsizing Government website. The following is a “guide” for those who are interested in alternative points of view (and who haven’t already sought refuge in a bunker).

Posted February 19, 2013

Fahrenthold’s piece is a good reminder of how unserious politicians from both parties are about cutting spending. But I want to make two additional points.

Posted February 18, 2013

Not surprisingly, special interests have been more than willing to assist reporters in spreading the doom and gloom.

Posted February 11, 2013

The following chart illustrates why it is ridiculous to act as if smaller future increases in projected spending amount to realized spending cuts. The chart shows the Congressional Budget Office’s August 2001 baseline estimate of defense spending from 2002 to 2011 versus the actual outlays

Posted February 04, 2013

As if on cue, the sequestration horror stories have commenced. It almost as if the government is incapable of cutting spending.

Posted January 28, 2013

Alas, the “draconian” spending cuts invariably turn out to be not-so-draconian after all. In fact, it’s often the case that reporters are talking about smaller spending increases rather than real spending cuts.

Posted January 27, 2013

In addition to not being free, federal subsidization of state spending makes it harder for taxpayers to understand and appreciate where their money is going and how it’s being spent.

Posted December 23, 2012

Rep. Bill Shuster (R-PA) is the new chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. His father, Bud, chaired the committee from 1995 to 2001 and would have been a first-ballot inductee into the Porker Hall of Fame if one existed.