Suzanne Fields

Such pure bigotry not only hurts Jews, though that is its aim, but will hurt Palestinians too -- the same people the self-righteous Europeans say they want to help by labeling targets for boycott. More than 23,000 Palestinians work in Judea and Samaria. Almost half of these workers are between the ages of 18 and 29, and their average daily pay is 88 percent higher than what they would be paid in Palestinian-controlled areas. These Palestinians who work for Jews have health benefits and pensions, which are not easily obtained in Palestinian factories and shops.

They can work in Judea and Samaria because they can be employed at 17, unlike the Palestinians who, for security reasons, must be at least 26. These fine points are lost on the liberal Europeans who feel oh-so-good about themselves when they can read a label and look for a Jew to target for "occupying" what they consider to be Palestinian territory. Jimmy Carter, the former president, knows better but pretends to be acting nobly as a defender of the labels.

"This is not an anti-Israel move," he insists, but merely a suggestion in behalf of a two-state solution.

Israel rightly identifies the labeling of Jews as the result of a double standard. Similar labels have not been imposed against others in other territories in dispute. The EU counters that they're not aiming for a boycott, only to offer a "service to the consumer."

That's what someone else said about splashing "Juden" on a Berlin storefront on a cold November night in 1938.

The Europeans don't post a similar "service to the consumer" on Spanish items from Catalonia or Russian goods from Chechnya, where the land is under dispute. The Jerusalem Post identifies other exceptions: No labels on products from northern Cyprus, Gibraltar, the Falklands, Western Sahara, Tibet, Kashmir, Armenian-held regions of Azerbaijan and Kosovo.

"If the only country you want to single out is Israel, that's anti-Semitism," says Abraham Foxman of the anti-Defamation League.

By adding her support to the labeling of Jews, Angela Merkel hurt her's and Germany's special relationship with Israel and casts a dark and ominous shadow over the good works of Germans since the end of World War II.

As they say in Yiddish, it's a shandeh, a shame.

Suzanne Fields

Suzanne Fields is currently working on a book that will revisit John Milton's 'Paradise Lost.'

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