Suzanne Fields

Barack Obama was in Berlin this week, and he was a different Barack Obama than the one who visited the German capital as a candidate in 2008. He was in a different Berlin, too. The welcome was warm, but the crowds were smaller and the adoration -- and that's exactly what it was -- has dissolved. The thrill is definitely gone.

Germany has clearly transformed itself. American Jews in particular appreciate the transformation of the dregs of the Third Reich into the redeemed engine of Europe. More than any other country that once constituted the Axis, Germany has tried to make amends for the Holocaust. They have paid reparations. Five and a half acres of the heart of Berlin is a memorial to the murdered Jews of Europe. A stroller in the city observes small bronze plaques at her feet, frequently imbedded in the sidewalk, inscribed with names of Jewish families who lived there before they were taken out of their homes and sent to death in concentration camps. Germany has welcomed with generous welfare benefits thousands of Jewish families from Russia who couldn't practice their religion there, and now they can in Germany.

The Germans have understood the lessons of history and their role in making that history. Germany has become a "special friend" of Israel and has cultivated that steadfast alliance when it wasn't always easy to do as a member of the European Union. But now that seems about to change. This probably isn't part of the conversations Mr. Obama will have with Angela Merkel (but should have been).

Capitulating to pressure, especially from the left-wing and anti-Zionist Green Party, Germany has joined 13 other EU members to put labels on products made in Jewish-owned factories on the West Bank, or in what Israelis call Judea and Samaria. This sends a chill and a shudder along the spines of those who know the history of Kristallnacht, "the night of the broken glass," when Nazi thugs broke the windows of Jewish merchants across Germany, singling out shops with windows splashed with the word "Juden," or painted with the slogan "Kauft nicht bei Juden!" Don't Buy from Jews!

"Whatever one may think of the peace process and the two-state solution," observes Michael Freund in the New York Sun, "it should be obvious that treating merchandise differently simply because the person who owns the factory where it was made is a follower of Moses rather than Muhammad is an act of pure bigotry."


Suzanne Fields

Suzanne Fields is currently working on a book that will revisit John Milton's 'Paradise Lost.'

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