Susan Stamper Brown
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It is as if some of those in leadership genuinely believe they know better than we do what is best for our kids. They don't. With that in mind, it is reasonable to assume that USDA-recommended lunches served by schools may or may not be healthy -- simply because officials haven't a clue what kids consume before and after school. Giving a child a school meal that was designed as a prototypical meal for the general population could, in reality, be a recipe for obesity based on an individual's overall eating habits.

Inspector Tubby's actions should serve to remind us how well-meaning rules or guidelines become grotesquely out-of-whack when the government sees fit to meddle in matters deemed personal. What was meant to help us hurts us when the government casts out a rule "for the greater good" and individuals get swallowed-up in the process.

A guideline is only as effective as its implementation. If there are other "Inspector Tubbys" out there doing the implementing, the well-meaning USDA guidelines the First Lady created to "improve the health and well-being of 32 million kids nationwide" could do the opposite to facilitate rather than impede childhood obesity.

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Susan Stamper Brown

Susan Stamper Brown's weekly column is nationally syndicated. She can be reached at writestamper@gmail.com or via her website at susan@susanstamperbrown.com. Her Facebook page can be found here.