Star Parker

A few weeks ago, Washington Wizards basketball player Jason Collins announced that he is gay. This was an event of such apparent import that he received a congratulatory phone call from the leader of the Democrat Party, President Barack Obama, and an official tweet from first lady Michelle. Both expressed their pride and joy about Collins' courageous coming out.

The plight of Carolyn Moos, the woman with whom Collins was living for eight years and to whom he once was engaged, was apparently of no interest to the Obamas, despite the president's supposed great concern for women's affairs, nor was the deceptive life that Collins lived with her.

Moos, 34, expressed distress at eight wasted prime years with Collins. She said that she never had a hint that Collins was gay and living a double life, and that she actually believed marriage and children were in the cards for them.

Perhaps if Sanford's adultery was a gay affair, liberals would be more understanding.

When the National Republican Congressional Committee pulled its support from Sanford's race following the news that he trespassed in the home of his former wife (to watch the Super Bowl with his son), support came in from both FreedomWorks PAC and the National Right to Life PAC.

Sanford's persona pulled in two streams of conservatives -- the economic conservatives and the social conservatives -- that many see at odds with each other.

A seasoned, principled and exciting conservative politician and leader is exactly what Republicans need today.

Welcome back to Washington, Mark Sanford.

Star Parker

Star Parker is founder and president of CURE, the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a 501c3 think tank which explores and promotes market based public policy to fight poverty, as well as author of the newly revised Uncle Sam's Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America's Poor and What We Can do About It.