Star Parker

It took a hurricane and a flood to wake up and turn around the basket case that was New Orleans. Ray Nagin, New Orleans’ mayor during Katrina, who blamed everyone but himself for the debacle that occurred, was just indicted on 21 counts of corruption.

New Orleans is now undergoing a renaissance. The public school system was turned over to a charter operator and the number of failing schools has dropped and test scores are improving.

Low taxes and a new spirit of entrepreneurship, spurred by such imaginative initiatives as Idea Village, has kept unemployment in New Orleans at less than two-thirds the national average.

Let’s get going with ideas like urban enterprise zones, championed by the late Congressman Jack Kemp, and now by economist Art Laffer, and give preferential tax treatment to employers and employees in blighted urban areas.

Abolish the minimum wage in these areas and give kids a chance at entry-level jobs and learning critical job skills.

The possibilities are only limited by our courage and imagination. But only one theme will save our large, urban cities, and their poor minority citizens.

Get them out from under political and union control and restore freedom, competition, and entrepreneurship.


Star Parker

Star Parker is founder and president of CURE, the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a 501c3 think tank which explores and promotes market based public policy to fight poverty, as well as author of the newly revised Uncle Sam's Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America's Poor and What We Can do About It.