Star Parker

Since the 1960s, American family life in general has deteriorated with the departure from traditional values and the concomitant growth in government and the welfare state.

But deterioration of black family life has been the most pronounced.

In 2008, according to a Pew Research Center report, 32 percent of black adults were married, compared to 61 percent in 1960.

These black pastors understand that collapse of family, out of wedlock births, single parent households, promiscuity, drugs and crime are the crises undermining black physical and economic health today. And they understand that a society that accepts as valid alternative lifestyles which undermine life sustaining Biblical truths is a society that will inevitably promote and advance this deadly behavior.

And they understand that the weakest communities are the most vulnerable - which means their own communities.

This Coalition of African-American pastors is showing, very much in the spirit of the civil rights movement, that the political choices facing blacks are not limited to deciding which political train to get on. They are jumping up front to influence where the train is going.

It’s high time for blacks to serve up some black tea to the Democratic Party, like the Tea Partiers are doing with Republicans, and move to change the values and direction of the party they have loyally supported but that’s no longer representing their interests.


Star Parker

Star Parker is founder and president of CURE, the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a 501c3 think tank which explores and promotes market based public policy to fight poverty, as well as author of the newly revised Uncle Sam's Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America's Poor and What We Can do About It.