Star Parker

Almost a half century since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, too many blacks still don’t want to be free and accept the responsibilities that go with it. Too many blacks still believe that the condition of their lives is caused by what someone else does or has.

It is sad that this is true despite the fact that blacks go to church more often, pray more often, and say religion plays a central part in their life more than any other ethnic group in the nation.

Why does a people so inclined to turn to God so readily violate the Tenth Commandment’s prohibition on covetousness and measure themselves in terms of what others have? And then use this sin to justify violating the Eighth Commandment and give government license to steal what others have in order to redistribute?

Perhaps most fundamentally, how can a church going people buy into the materialism of socialism?

There is a solution to the general travails of our nation and the particular travails of our black brothers and sisters.

It is called every man and woman taking personal responsibility for their lives, turning to government for protection of life and property - not redemption, and living as free people according to traditional biblical mores.

Star Parker

Star Parker is founder and president of CURE, the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a 501c3 think tank which explores and promotes market based public policy to fight poverty, as well as author of the newly revised Uncle Sam's Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America's Poor and What We Can do About It.


TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP