Star Parker

Regarding pleas about saving teachers’ jobs, it’s not about this at all. It’s about teachers’ unions refusing to make concessions and hard adjustments like all Americans are making.

Steve Moore of the Wall Street Journal recently wrote about the refusal of the teachers’ union in Milwaukee to negotiate with the local school board and make any concession in which teachers would have to contribute something to their health plan. Their plan, according to Moore, costs taxpayers $26, 844 per family, compared to $14,500 which typifies private employer plans.

The union held out, letting some teachers get laid off, waiting for bailout from Washington.

Priorities in Washington have always been influenced by who’s got the money as opposed to who’s got the ideas. Today mores than ever.

And for the poor?

The main way to end the poverty cycle is to get poor children educated. And it’s the teachers’ unions that fight school choice.

A major driver of poor youth unemployment is the minimum wage, aggressively supported by unions.

But unions have campaign funds. So they will step ahead of the poor in line when Washington sets priorities. This will be true whether it’s a question of funding existing programs for the poor, like food stamps, or pushing forward innovative market based ideas to combat poverty.


Star Parker

Star Parker is founder and president of CURE, the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a 501c3 think tank which explores and promotes market based public policy to fight poverty, as well as author of the newly revised Uncle Sam's Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America's Poor and What We Can do About It.