Star Parker

Pollsters Doug Schoen and Pat Caddell, both Democrats, took on President Obama in a column in the Wall Street Journal last week, criticizing him for not being true to his campaign promise to unify the country.

“Rather than being a unifier,” they say, “Mr. Obama has divided America on the basis of race, class, and partisanship.”

They don’t see Republicans as any better. They claim that Republicans have just followed the administration in trying to exploit hot buttons of race and class.

“….the Republican leadership has failed to put forth an agenda that is more positive, unifying, and inclusive.”

Although it seems so warm and cuddly to consider the idea of national “unity”, what does this really mean? Particularly, what does it mean in a free country?

Isn’t the whole point and beauty of freedom that we recognize differences among us as natural and that we view debate, differences of viewpoint, and dissent as healthy? Doesn’t the idea of “unity” – of uniformity - conjure up images of exactly what this country is not about?

A recent Gallup poll on confidence of Americans in our various institutions shows that far and away the institution that we have most confidence in is our military.

On the most basic question – our survival – and our attitude toward those whose job it is to protect us – Americans are not suffering from division and ambivalence.

But in contrast to the military, in which 76% of Americans express a “great deal” of confidence, in what institution do we show the least confidence?

The U.S. Congress. Only 11% of Americans express confidence in our elected Representatives.

Understanding why there is such a world of difference in how Americans view our soldiers opposed to our Congress sheds light on the unity issue.

The first order of business in doing a job evaluation is defining what that job is. Once that is clear, we can determine if it is being done well.

In this regard, we have pretty good clarity regarding our armed forces and what their job is. We may have differences regarding how we use our troops. But that it is civilian question, not a military question.

When the appropriateness of General McChrystal’s behavior came into question and he was fired, the outspoken General saluted and quietly exited as a soldier and a gentleman.

But how about the U.S. Congress? Consider your sense of clarity regarding what their job is compared to our military. Consider your sense of what they think their job is.

A little vague? A lot vague?

This is where our problem lies.

America isn’t about unity. America is about freedom.


Star Parker

Star Parker is founder and president of CURE, the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a 501c3 think tank which explores and promotes market based public policy to fight poverty, as well as author of the newly revised Uncle Sam's Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America's Poor and What We Can do About It.