Rich Galen

  • That keening sound you heard Tuesday morning coming from newspaper and network newsrooms all over the land?
  • The moans of distress coming from Howard Dean’s office at the Democratic National Committee?
  • The atavistic sobbing and wailing which caromed against the stone floors and walls of the Capitol Building from the Democratic Leadership offices in the House and Senate?
  • As Inigo Montoya once said to Fezzik: “That is the sound of ultimate suffering. My heart made that sound when the six-fingered man killed my father.”
  • Alas, it was the sound of ultimate suffering; of editors and reporters, Democratic Members and staffers, Liberal pundits and pollsters, all reading the headline in the New York Times:
  • Rove Won't Be Charged in C.I.A. Leak Case

  • Arrrrrgggghhh!
  • The Times’ David Johnston wrote, in his opening graf which was barely legible for the tear-stains:
    • The prosecutor in the C.I.A. leak case on Monday advised Karl Rove, the senior White House adviser, that he would not be charged with any wrongdoing, effectively ending the nearly three-year criminal investigation that had at times focused intensely on Mr. Rove.

  • This was the biggest disappointment for National Democrats since last October 28 when Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald announced Vice President Dick Cheney’s chief of staff, Scooter Libby, would be indicted on perjury and obstruction charges, but that Karl Rove would not.
  • Last month a Liberal webpage, truthout.org, reported that Rove had informed the President that an indictment was imminent. As the MSNBC webpage reported the next day,
  • At a Michigan Trial Lawyers’ Association dinner Saturday night the group’s vice president Robert Raitt announced that [Rove] had just been indicted. The announcement reportedly prompted a standing ovation by the crowd of 700, which included Sen. Hillary Clinton.
  • Trial lawyers? A standing ovation at the announcement of an indictment? One might have thought each would have had one hand busy sending a Blackberry message to the White House looking for a client.
  • What else can go wrong for the Democrats?
    • — They lost the biggest special Congressional election of the year in San Diego; ­

      — The USA Today/Gallup poll release yesterday has the President’s approval numbers up to 38% (from a low of 31% just a month earlier);­

      — That same poll has the “generic Congressional vote” at 49% for Democrats to 44% Republicans which sounds bad, but earlier this month it was 55-40;­

      — Zarqawi is dead;

      — The Iraqis have a fully functioning government in place;­

      — The President made a surprise visit to Baghdad;­

      — The Republican National Committee has a 5-to-1 cash-on-hand advantage over the DNC, and;­

       — Karl Rove is off the hook.

  • And all that occurred just in the past eight days.
  • Tell me, again, how likely it is that the Democrats will pick up 15 seats in the House and six in the Senate?
  • One reporter called and asked if the Rove business wasn’t “just the absence of bad news?” I suggested it was far from that because it was another nail in the coffin of the Pelosi/Reid Culture of Corruption strategy which had been on life support since, (a) Congressman William Jefferson got caught hiding $90,000 in his home freezer and, (b) Harry Reid got caught taking free, high-priced, tickets to champeenchip fights in Las Vegas.
  • Without having to constantly look over his shoulder to see if Fitzgerald is unleashing his legal lasso, Rove will now be free to do what he does best: Get his arms around the political situation in the country and design the strategies and tactics to confound the experts in November.
  • Then all we’ll hear will be the Sounds of Silence from his critics.
  • On the Secret Decoder Ring today: A link to the NY Times piece, an explanation of the title and the last line, another in the series of wildly popular license plate Mullfotos and a Catchy Caption of the Day featuring a woman in a bikini.

  • Rich Galen

    Rich Galen has been a press secretary to Dan Quayle and Newt Gingrich. Rich Galen currently works as a journalist and writes at Mullings.com.