Phyllis Schlafly

Have you checked your kids' school assignments lately? You might be shocked if you do.

Sixth-grade children in a history class in the Bryant School District in Arkansas (whose website brags that the district "has embraced" Common Core standards) were assigned a project to update the U.S. Bill of Rights because it is "outdated." They were instructed to "prioritize, revise, omit two and add two amendments."

The written assignment is full of lies, such as "the government of the United States is currently revisiting the Bill of Rights"; that "They (presumably the government) have determined that it is outdated and may not remain in its current form any longer;" and that our Constitution can be changed by a "National Revised Bill of Rights Task Force (NRBR)" (to which students could be appointed).

St. Joseph-Ogden High School, a public school in St. Joseph, Ill., gave its sophomore class an assignment to choose which of 10 people were "worthy" of getting kidney dialysis when the hospital had only six machines. The assignment instructed the students, "four people are not going to live. You must decide from the information below which six will survive."

The students were given the list of the 10 who desperately needed kidney dialysis with identification about their occupation, age and ethnicity, and told to give each a score. The instructions stated: "Put the people in order using 1-10, 1 being the person you want to save first and 10 being the person you would save last," with the assumption that those getting scores 7 through 10 would be marked for death.

Since when are high school students allowed to judge who may live and who must die? Is this to prepare us to accept death panels from Obamacare?

Unfortunately, such public school class assignments are not new. A Department of Education hearing in Seattle on March 13, 1984, heard a parent describe the health class in Clackamas High School in Oregon.

Students were presented with the "lifeboat situation": too many people are in the sinking lifeboat and the students were ordered to choose whose lives are not worth saving and should be thrown overboard so the lifeboat won't sink. Variations of the lifeboat situation have been widely used in public schools for many years.

A drama teacher at Cactus Shadows High School in Cave Creek, Ariz., had his students perform a play in which one of the characters falls in love with a goat. The play includes sexually explicit content and vulgar sexual terms.


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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