Phyllis Schlafly

Early voting is a matter of state law, and some states don't allow it at all. Lawsuits by the NAACP and the ACLU are seeking to overturn laws limiting early voting by making contrived arguments that these laws violate the Constitution, which is ridiculous.

Early voting is actually contrary to the spirit of the U.S. Constitution. Article II states, "the Congress may determine the Time of choosing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes, which Day shall be the same throughout the United States." Federal law sets the date for national elections on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November.

Early voting increases the influence of big money spent on campaigns because it requires candidates to campaign, to spend and to buy expensive television ads over additional weeks. Early voting increases opportunities for ballot fraud because the necessary poll watchers we expect to be on the job at polling places on Election Day can't be present for so many days.

Encouraging people to close their minds and cast an irrevocable ballot before all the presidential debates are held is as harmful to a fair outcome as it would be to allow jurors to vote guilty or not guilty before they hear all the evidence in a trial. Hillary Clinton called the North Carolina law's provisions "the greatest hits of voter suppression," but the real "hits" are the way illegal votes cancel out the votes of honest Americans.

In 2012, the Democrats were so sure that North Carolina was a happy hunting ground for their votes that they held their National Convention in Charlotte to re-nominate Barack Obama. North Carolina promptly responded by voting down same-sex marriage in a referendum and then passing a bunch of good laws. So, cheer up, conservatives.

In addition to the helpful new voting laws, North Carolina passed stricter regulations on abortion clinics, ended teacher tenure, cut unemployment benefits, blocked the expansion of Medicaid and (despite the scorn of propagandists for the national takeover of education by Common Core) mandated the teaching of cursive writing. Maybe that's why the liberals are so angry: Kids will now be able to read letters from their grandmothers.


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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