Phyllis Schlafly

Early voting is a misnomer. More precise names would be premature voting, uninformed voting or political machine voting.

What if jurors were allowed to decide they are tired of a lengthy trial and want to vote to convict a defendant midway through the trial and go home? Isn't it just as important for voters to hear all the facts about candidates before voting?

Absentee voting provides another big opportunity for election fraud because it deprives many voters of our precious secret ballot. Here is one way that absentee voting works.

An Arkansas state legislator, Rep. Hudson Hallum, bribed voters with money and food to cast their absentee ballots for him, obtained and distributed ballots to those voters, and then collected then in unsealed envelopes. If the ballots were marked for Hallum's opponent, Hallum pitched them. Hallum pled guilty to election fraud.

Mail-in ballots are subject to the same problem. Most of them are probably not secret ballots but cast without traditional safeguards of secrecy and freedom from coercion, and you don't know who is looking at them before they are dropped in the ballot box.

Obama's margin of victory was only a few hundred thousand votes in the four swing states of Florida, Ohio, Virginia and New Hampshire. That was far less than the number of mailed-in ballots cast.

Another easy way this racket works is to take absentee ballots to nursing homes and assisted-living institutions. The campaign worker "helps" the physically or mentally disabled senior citizens choose for whom they want to vote, marks the ballot and then turns it in.

The Democrats' party line is that voter fraud is a myth, but that illusion was dispelled by another stunning case of fraud by a prominent incumbent. The son and field director of U.S. Rep. Jim Moran, who has been in office for 22 years representing Virginia's Washington suburbs, was filmed by videographer James O'Keefe advising an undercover reporter how to bypass Virginia's voter ID law. The method was exquisitely ingenious: it called for creating fake utility bills on the internet to substitute for voter ID.


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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