Phyllis Schlafly

A first-grade girl in North Carolina wrote a poem for her school's Veterans Day assembly honoring her two grandfathers who had served in the Vietnam War that included the sentences, "He prayed to God for peace. He prayed to God for strength." The school censored the word God out of the poem before the kid read it. A Texas high school ordered the football coach not to bow his head or kneel when the team said a prayer before a game.

Cranston High School West in Rhode Island banned a prayer banner that had hung on the auditorium wall for 38 years without complaint. The banner read in part: "Our Heavenly Father, Grant us each day the desire to do our best ... Help us to be good sports and smile when we lose as well as when we win. Teach us the value of true friendship. Help us always to conduct ourselves so as to bring credit to Cranston High West. Amen."

A Plano, Tex. school banned an eight-year-old from handing out candy canes with Jesus' name on them to classmates at a school holiday party, confiscated a girl's pencils because they mentioned "God" and banned an entire classroom from writing "Merry Christmas" on cards to be sent to our troops serving in the Middle East. Litigation followed the action of a Texas high school that tried to forbid cheerleaders from displaying a banner at a football game with the Bible verse: "And let us run with endurance the race God has set before us."

President Obama is a major part of the campaign to secularize America. For the fourth straight year, Obama again deleted God from his Thanksgiving Day address as he personally read it from the teleprompter into a camera.

Of course, there is nothing in the U.S. Constitution that requires this anti-Christmas nonsense. The purpose of all these actions is to mandate a religion of secularism, which is completely contrary to American history, heritage and constitutional law.

Christians had better wake up and realize the threat of the secularists to the First Amendment. Our answer to the ACLU and atheist lawyers who are trying to change America should be the favorite words of Scrooge in Charles Dickens' story, "A Christmas Carol": "Bah, humbug!"


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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