Phyllis Schlafly

I'm betting that Dierker will not be intimidated by the radical feminists' histrionics because he has the great quality of "manliness," so well described in Harvard professor Harvey Mansfield's recent book of that name. Mansfield defines manliness as "confidence in the face of risk" and assertiveness in causes beyond themselves.

Dierker, indeed, has taken on a cause beyond himself even though he recognizes it is "the third rail" of politics. This battle desperately needs to be fought by a sitting judge who can report on the feminists' judicial assault on the U.S. Constitution, on the separation of powers, and on the equal protection clause, which they pervert to function like George Orwell's "Animal Farm," where "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." Mansfield describes the philosophical background of what he calls feminist "nihilism," i.e., an attack on men, morality, marriage, masculinity, motherhood and human nature. Dierker likewise understands that the radical feminist agenda "is based on hatred for men" and disdain for what feminists repeatedly deride as the Ozzie and Harriet traditional family lifestyle. In criticizing what he calls "The Cloud Cuckooland of Radical Feminism," Dierker describes how feminists use sexual harassment litigation to punish men. Cooperative courts now allow sexual harassment litigation based on words alone, without evidence of objective harm to the woman or job detriment. Sexual harassment claims have become the weapon by which feminists vent their malice toward men. "Illiberal liberals and feminists don't want equality; they want to make some people more equal than others. And they've made it happen through their dominance of the courts." Dierker accurately points out the mischief of gender commissions that demand changes in the way courts treat women, quotas in judicial appointments, and special training to re-educate judges and lawyers to toe the feminist line, especially in cases involving domestic violence. This feminist indoctrination encourages prosecutors to "pursue rape cases to trial, regardless of the merits of the case" (like the prosecutor of the Duke lacrosse players?), and never to criticize feminist jurisprudence. Why hasn't Congress used its constitutional power to limit the jurisdiction of federal judges? Maybe because the "tyranny of tolerance" has so intimidated congressmen that they lack the manliness to risk the tantrums of the illiberals and the feminists.


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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