Paul Jacob

“A large number of Washington’s top earners fit into the less productive category,” Lane concludes, adding, “Various societies have grown free and prosperous by many different methods; dividing up existing wealth according to political connections is not one of them.”

Lane has articulated a different take on economic justice — one that has something to do with justice, with fairness even. One that free-market conservatives and libertarians should enthusiastically embrace.

What does this mean?

It means we should forget about micromanaging the economy through minimum wage hikes. Stop making welfare pay better than work — as it does in 35 states, according to a recent Cato Institute study. End government subsidies to GreenTech cronies and also to more sympathetically-portrayed farmers. And everyone else.

That’s economic justice.

Most of all, start demanding an end to licensing laws and regulations that block access to starting a business. Not the new tax free deal for new businesses offered by New York State, intending to continue to punish its current struggling businesses with the same high taxes, plus the new tax-freebusinesses’ share. But an economy in which there are no special deals for some businneses over others and a welcome mat out for any new endeavor.That conception of a just and fair and free market economy, however, would necessarily reduce the power and wealth of those doing the horse-trading and landing the contracts for guns and butter in the nation’s capitol.

That conception of a just and fair and free market economy, however, would necessarily reduce the power and wealth of those doing the horse-trading and landing the contracts for guns and butter in the nation’s capitol. [references]


Paul Jacob

Paul Jacob is President of Citizens in Charge Foundation and Citizens in Charge. His daily Common Sense commentary appears on the Web and via e-mail.