Pat Buchanan
As every schoolchild used to know, the Trojan Horse was the scheme of the "wily Ulysses," one of the Greek warriors besieging Troy. For a decade, the Greeks had failed to capture the great city. In defeat and resignation, they adopted Ulysses' plan. They would build a great wooden horse and leave it outside the city walls, ostensibly as a tribute to the goddess Minerva. The Greek army would then board ships, sail over the horizon and wait – for the Trojan Horse was hollow, and filled with Greek warriors. If the Trojans left the horse outside the city, the Greeks would sail home. But if the Trojans wheeled the horse into the city, the warriors within would open the gates and signal their comrades to return and attack. "Beware of the Greeks bearing gifts" said old Laocoon, who urged the Trojans to burn the horse. But the Trojans thought the horse magnificent and wheeled it in. And then began the revels of victory. The rest is history, or marvelous myth. On receiving his Nobel Prize, U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan dulcetly described the Trojan Horse that is to bring about an end of nations. In a speech that The Washington Post's James Hoagland hailed as "subtly subversive," Annan declared: In the 21st century, "the mission of the United Nations will be defined by a new, more profound, awareness of the sanctity and dignity of every human life. ... This will require us to look beyond the framework of states." That "new, more profound awareness of the sanctity of human life," of course, does not extend to the unborn – millions of whom are butchered yearly through forced abortions under revolting regimes like China's, the principal beneficiary of U.N. population funds. "The sovereignty of nations must no longer be used as a shield for gross violations of human rights," said Annan. And if a nation violates human rights, who has the authority to intervene? His answer: We do, the U.N. Yet, there are only two ways this can happen: The U.N. creates its own army or the U.N. conscripts the armies of member states. But what is the only country with military forces capable of global intervention for the U.N. to conscript? Americans, too, hold that we are endowed by our Creator with "certain inalienable rights" that no government may violate. But in America, those rights are not protected by foreign armies, but by a Constitution that binds rulers – it does not empower them. The notion of a world government to defend our rights would have sent the founding fathers running for their muskets. "Today," said Annan, "no walls can separate humanitarian or human-rights crises in one part of the world from national security crises in another." But this is a formula for endless interventions into the affairs of nations whose practices do not conform to U.N. standards, as agreed upon by a General Assembly made up of regimes that range from the democratic to the dictatorial to the criminal. The new U.N. role is "eradicating poverty, preventing conflict and promoting democracy," said Annan. But the U.N. has no money to eradicate poverty, other than what we give. And the U.N. cannot promote democracy without more power or prevent conflict without an army. Hoagland's phrase "subtly subversive" is dead on. Behind every paragraph of Annan's speech lies this assumption: The U.N. must have more authority, more money, more power to create the new world. Yet, such a transfer of power cannot occur without a commensurate cost in American sovereignty and independence. And what reason is there to believe a world government can better bring peace on earth than a world where America is the lone superpower? "The idea that there is one people in the possession of truth has done untold harm through history," said Annan, "especially in the last century." But that is because communism, Nazism and all the "smelly little orthodoxies" of Orwell's ridicule were rooted in lies. That does not make world government the truth. As Christians, we believe the Word of God, Christ Himself, is "the Way, the Truth and the Life." Not the U.N. The U.N. is not only a Trojan Horse of global government bent upon a diminution of the liberty for which our founding fathers risked their lives, fortunes and sacred honor. It is an idol, a false god, a totem, a golden calf to which modernists burn their incense – another smelly little orthodoxy, just like all the rest. So, Kofi, my man, congrats on the tin badge in Stockholm, but your big tent of global parasites up there on Turtle Bay is as big a scam as the rest of them, and, down deep, you know it. It's all about power, fella. Like Laocoon said: Burn that horse!

Pat Buchanan

Pat Buchanan is a founding editor of The American Conservative magazine, and the author of many books including State of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America .
 
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