Nathan Tabor

"The first national Thanksgiving was proclaimed in 1789 by President George Washington, but after Washington, national Thanksgiving proclamations were sporadic; most official Thanksgiving observances occurred at the state level. In fact, by 1815, state governments had issued no less than 1,400 official prayer proclamations, almost half of which were for days of thanksgiving and prayer," said Barton (http://www.wallbuilders.com/).

Barton points out: "In the first half of the nineteenth century, Mrs. Sarah Josepha Hale, the editor of Godey's Lady's Book (a popular lady's books containing poetry, art work, and articles by America's leading authors) began to lobby for a national Day of Thanksgiving. F or nearly three decades, she contacted president after president until Abraham Lincoln responded in 1863 by setting aside the last Thursday of that November.

"Over the next seventy-five years, presidents faithfully followed Lincoln's precedent, annually declaring a national Thanksgiving Day, but the date of the celebrations varied widely from proclamation to proclamation. In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt celebrated Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday of November and maintained that date year by year throughout his presidency. In 1941, Congress permanently established the fourth Thursday in November as the national Thanksgiving holiday."

When President Barack Obama and his cheerleaders on the left tell Americans that their nation is not a Christian one, perhaps they'd be better served if they read a little unadulterated and non-politically correct American history. They will undoubtedly find numerous references to God, His blessings and His mercy. Perhaps what this nation needs is a revival of the true celebration of Thanksgiving Day.


Nathan Tabor

Nathan Tabor organizes and educates Christians on their role in Politics.
 
TOWNHALL DAILY: Be the first to read Nathan Tabor's column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com daily lineup delivered each morning to your inbox.