Nathan Tabor

I’m beginning to understand what Samuel Clemens, aka, Mark Twain must have felt like when he somberly pronounced to an astonished reporter who thought the writer had passed away, “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated!”

I’ve been somewhat amiss in the last few weeks in posting my observations here about the political world and life in general, even more so of a concern since the recent congressional elections have rearranged the variables of where our country might be heading. I do want to thank all of you who e-mailed me, asking if things were well.

They are. As a matter of fact, things are great! But before I explain why, let’s knock-down some speculation that has been floating about concerning my “demise”:

  • I have not been advising Elisabeth Hasselbeck of ABC’s “The View,” on how to handle her newest co-host. I did suggest, however, that she accessorize her fashionable attire with something practical. Maybe a baseball bat.
  • I wasn’t conferring with Speaker Pelosi and her choice for House Majority Leader. She blew that first exercise of Democratic Party leadership all by herself.
  • That was not me passing out pictures in midtown Manhattan of a costumed Rudy Giuliani dressed in something other than a business suit.
  • Instead, and allowing me to switch gears for a bit of seriousness, I am in the middle of a promotional tour for my newest book, The Beast on the East River: The UN Threat to America's Sovereignty and Security (Publisher Nelson Current, ISBN 1595550534, Hardcover, $24.99).

Along the way, I was interviewed on the 700 Club about the book and its subject, the United Nations. I’m also happy to find that book reviewers have picked up on the distinction between The Beast on the East River and other books of this genre, a distinction that I feel is important in reaching a receptive audience.

As Henry Mark Holzer, Professor Emeritus at Brooklyn Law School notes, the book pulls away from the all too often “…propagandistic diatribes against the UN that have been self-defeating because of their strident tone, frequent factual inaccuracies, and lack of clear focus.” Instead, the book “…provides a measured intellectual argument against allowing the corrupt collectivist internationalists of the UN, and its many metastasized affiliates, to undermine and eventually steal one of America’s most precious possessions: its sovereignty.”


Nathan Tabor

Nathan Tabor organizes and educates Christians on their role in Politics.
 
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