Mona Charen

"As part of the freshman orientation program, students are required to attend an event entitled 'Sex on a Saturday Night.' It consists of a series of skits ostensibly designed to discourage 'date rape.' For years, critics have contended that the play, which features vulgarity and suggestive conduct, does nothing to serve this laudable goal; rather, it reinforces the campus culture of sexual permissiveness, primarily by shaping students' expectations to include sexual license as normal. "And then there is 'Sex Jeopardy' (officially 'Safer Sex Jeopardy'), an event that Princeton freshmen are 'strongly encouraged' by the University to attend. Modeled on the long-running television game show, this activity invites students to show off their knowledge of such topics as anal intercourse, flavored condoms, dental dams, sex toys and sado-masochism. As described by one female student, Sex Jeopardy is 'suffused with sexual bravado and conveys the strong impression that only someone with hang-ups would have a moral problem with hook-ups.'" Every generation of young people wants, maybe even needs, to believe it is the first to discover sex. But how can a college student act out or sow seeds of rebellion when the boundaries are already so flaccid? Our liberal universities are officious about warning kids of the dangers of STDs, pregnancy and date rape. But sadly, those are the only dangers they perceive in sexual license. If they cannot imagine that "sex workers" are degraded by their work, how can they begin to understand that promiscuity compromises self-worth? Many college campuses today seem bent on satisfying nearly every imaginable sexual appetite in a "nonjudgmental" environment. In fact, the only people who today feel judged are those -- and there are many -- who reject the casual "hook-up" culture in favor of modesty, old-fashioned dating and even (gasp) chastity. George and Londregan suggest colleges have a duty to fund student centers for those students just as they fund centers for gay and lesbian students. It's a good idea. But it's sad that sexual restraint has become an alternative lifestyle.


Mona Charen

Mona Charen is a syndicated columnist, political analyst and author of Do-Gooders: How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help .
 
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