Mona Charen

Ellen became a nurse and then a very successful small business owner. Her sister got a masters degree in math and engineering at Johns Hopkins, and has started three companies. Another sister became a vice president of Fidelity Investments. When she had her third child, which made three under the age of 5, she decided to withdraw from the business world for a while. Fidelity offered her inducements to remain but she turned them aside. Her husband was hired in her place. Ellen's brother became an electrical engineer. All four siblings are happily married (no divorces) and among them they have a passel of kids. "Behind every great woman is her dad," declares UC Davis psychologist Dean K. Simonton, author of a book on eminent women. "Women who are eminent are highly likely to have developed very close relationships with their fathers," he claims. In the past 15 years or so, we've heard a great deal about the importance of fathers -- that children raised by single mothers are far more likely to suffer a number of problems and pathologies that do not stalk children from intact families nearly so much. But what Ellen's story illustrates is that, even in intact families, fathers are sometimes -- maybe not usually, but sometimes -- the more nurturing parent. And as long as someone is there for the kids, why are feminists, of all people, complaining? To find out more about Mona Charen and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. COPYRIGHT 2008 CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC.


Mona Charen

Mona Charen is a syndicated columnist, political analyst and author of Do-Gooders: How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help .
 
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