Mona Charen

Visiting New Orleans for the 15th time since the hurricane of 2005, President Bush declared last week that "When Katrina broke through the levees, it broke a lot of hearts. But it didn't affect the spirit of a lot of citizens of this community." The city of New Orleans, the president assured his listeners, "is coming back."

That is doubtful. New Orleans was deeply troubled before Katrina, beset by corruption, high crime rates, poor family structure and a weak economy. Nearly one-third of New Orleans residents had incomes below the poverty level. The schools were abysmal. Some estimates put the dropout rate at 50 percent. Was it any surprise that the state and local officials who presided over what in another context we might label a "failed state" responded so poorly to Hurricane Katrina?

But on this second anniversary of the catastrophic hurricane, we are being asked to think with our emotions. Isn't it wonderful that so many are rebuilding their homes and their lives? Don't we need to spend even more money to make this dream a reality for more of the displaced?

A disaster like Katrina should be the occasion for a sober evaluation of costs and benefits. What was a huge city doing below sea level on the hurricane-prone Gulf Coast anyway? "New Orleans naturally wants to be a lake," Timothy Kusky, St. Louis University professor of earth and atmospheric sciences, told Time magazine. Only reckless development transformed a former cypress swamp into the Lower Ninth Ward. And only a complex system of levees and pumps kept the basin dry even in the best of times.

As Jack Shafer noted in Slate magazine, "Settlers built the original city on a curve of high flood land that the Mississippi River had deposited over eons, hence the name 'crescent city.' But starting in the late 1800s and continuing into the early 20th century, developers began clearing and draining swamps behind the crescent, even dumping landfill into Lake Pontchartrain to extend the city."

Can you say "tempting fate"? A Katrina evacuee interviewed on one of the networks cited costly insurance as one of the biggest obstacles to returning home. Well, yes. Her plea was for government aid to reduce the cost.

There has been no shortage of aid. The Washington Times reports that federal spending on the Gulf Coast in the past two years ($127 billion) has exceeded total spending on the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe after World War II (in inflation-adjusted dollars). More than $7 billion has been allocated by the federal government to rebuild the levees and repair the flood protection system for New Orleans, and President Bush plans to ask for another $7.6 billion in next year's budget to (ahem) complete the work.


Mona Charen

Mona Charen is a syndicated columnist, political analyst and author of Do-Gooders: How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help .
 
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