Miriam Grossman, M.D.

The response to the CDC’s report last week that 25% of teen girls carry a sexually transmitted infection suggests that this comes as a shock to many, including some in our sex education industry.

This is reminiscent of the scene in Casablanca in which Captain Renault tells Rick that he is “shocked - shocked! - to find that gambling is going on in here”, and then quietly collects his winnings.

The pandemic of STIs in this country is a logical consequence of the way we educate kids about sexuality. Until an “extreme makeover” of our methods takes place, young people – especially girls – will continue to pay an awful price.

Consider an organization like SIECUS ( Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States ), the leading voice for sexuality education in this country. Their Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education is in widespread use: over 100,000 copies have been distributed, and it is downloaded at the rate of 1,000 per month. Thanks to this document, our children are instructed from a tender age that “all persons are sexual”, that “both boys and girls have parts of the body that feel good when touched”, and that “couples have varied ways to share sexual pleasure.” Mind you, this is what they deem appropriate for five to eight year olds. While acknowledging that “early involvement in sexual behaviors poses risks”, one of SEICUS’ “inherent values” is that “young people explore their sexuality as a natural process in achieving sexual maturity.”

With that message coming from professionals, we shouldn’t be surprised to learn that 34% of girls are sexually active by fifteen. That figure goes up to nearly 80% five years later, with over a fifth of all fifteen to nineteen year olds reporting two or more partners in the past year. Hey, they are exploring their sexuality; it’s only “natural”.

For a teenage girl in 2008, “exploring” her sexuality places her at risk for some two dozen different bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi. She is likely to be infected soon after her sexual debut. This is due to the prevalence of these organisms, their ability to infect without symptoms, the widespread practice of casual sex with multiple “partners”, the inconsistent and improper use of condoms, and to a girl’s physiological vulnerability.

SEICUS emphasizes that “sexuality is a central part of being human,” and it wants our kids to know that it is “a natural and healthy part of living.” That may have been an important message for young people to hear when the organization was founded some forty years ago. But things have changed. We’re fighting a battle against a multitude of new bugs, and the bugs are winning.


Miriam Grossman, M.D.

Miriam Grossman, M.D. is a board certified child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist. She is author of the new book "You're Teaching My Child What?"