Michelle Malkin

Both Stotsky and Milgram repeatedly asked their panel colleagues for the names of the countries the Common Core standards were allegedly "benchmarked" to, but they never received an answer.

Furthermore, Christopher Tienken of Seton Hall University notes that much of the "evidence" and "empirical research" that the Common Core crowd cites comes from ... the Common Core crowd. "When I reviewed that 'large and growing body of knowledge,'" Tienken reported, "I found that it was not large, and in fact built mostly on one report, Benchmarking for Success, created by the NGA (National Governors Association) and the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers), the same groups that created these standards. Hardly independent research."

Jeb Bush routinely has dismissed those who protest Common Core's increasing federalization of local control over schools as conspiracy-mongers. But it's President Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan who've made common cause with Bush and corporate elites in foisting Common Core standards, tests, technology and data-mining boondoggles on local school districts. Obama, Duncan and Bush have been meeting with deep-pocketed CEOs in Washington, not with ordinary parents outside the Beltway.

Dr. Bill Evers of the Hoover Institution succinctly debunked Bush's repeated insistence that 45 states voluntarily adopted the irresistibly rigorous standards:

"(S)tates weren't leaping because they couldn't resist the Core's academic magnetism. They were leaping because it was the Great Recession -- and the Obama administration was dangling a $4.35 billion Race to the Top carrot in front of them. Big points in that federal program were awarded for adopting the Core, so, with little public debate, most did."

Can you spell b-o-o-n-d-o-g-g-l-e? Remember: Bush's educational foundation, the Foundation for Excellence in Education, is tied at the hip to the federally funded testing consortium called PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers), which raked in $186 million through Race to the Top to develop nationalized tests "aligned" to the top-down Common Core program.

One of the Bush foundation's behemoth corporate sponsors is Pearson, the multi-billion-dollar educational publishing and testing conglomerate. Pearson snagged $23 million in contracts to design the first wave of PARCC test items. The company holds a $250 million contract with Florida to design and publish its state tests. Pearson designed New York's Common Core-aligned assessments and is also the exclusive contractor for Texas state tests.

And in Los Angeles this summer, Pearson sealed a whopping $30 million taxpayer-subsidized deal to supply the city's schools with 45,000 iPads pre-loaded with Pearson Common Core curriculum apps. That's $678 per iPad, $200 more than the standard cost, with scant evidence that any of this shiny edu-tech will do anything to improve the achievement bottom line.

As with all political posers who grab power under the guise of doing it "for the children," don't read their lips. Follow the money.


Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

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