Michelle Malkin
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A military jury sentenced unrepentant Fort Hood jihadist Nidal Hasan to death on Wednesday. But if another murderous Muslim soldier's case is any indication, Hasan may be sitting in the catbird seat for years to come. And our men and women in uniform will remain endangered by Islamic vigilantes in their own ranks.

Remember Sgt. Hasan Akbar? On March 23, 2003, this hate-filled soldier with the 326th Engineer Battalion lobbed stolen hand grenades and shot his M-4 automatic rifle into three tents filled with sleeping commanding officers at the 101st Airborne Division's 1st Brigade operations center in Kuwait. The grenade attack claimed the lives of two American patriots: Capt. Christopher Seifert and Maj. Gregory Stone.

Like Hasan, the militant Muslim Akbar gave plenty of notice that he was a threat to his fellow servicemen. His bosses pegged him as a menace with an "attitude problem" well before the fragging. Despite several incidents of insubordination and prior invocation of his Islamic beliefs to skip out of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Akbar's superiors dispatched him to Kuwait on the eve of the invasion of Iraq -- and put him in charge of clearing land mines. Sensitivity trumped soldier safety.

At Akbar's court martial, prosecutors read vengeful quotes from his diary, in which he vowed: "I am going to try and kill as many of them as possible," and "My life will not be complete unless America is destroyed." Eyewitnesses said that after his arrest he inveighed against his fellow troops: "You guys are coming into our countries, and you're going to rape our women and kill our children."

This soldier of Allah, not America, was sentenced to death in April 2005 on two counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of premeditated attempted murder. But Hasan Akbar, unlike his victims, still lives. And so does his Koran-inspired hatred of our soldiers (a pathology addressed specifically in the slide presentation Nidal Hasan gave to his colleagues at Walter Reed Army Hospital).

As I reported exclusively during the trial, Akbar stole a pair of scissors and stabbed an attending MP in the shoulder and neck. The judge downplayed the new attack as an "opportunistic stabbing." Meanwhile, Akbar's lawyers are using every opportunity to exploit the legal system. Eight years after his sentencing and 10 years after his jihad attack, Akbar's case remains on appeal. It is likely headed for the Supreme Court -- and even after that, no execution will take place until the president gives it a green light.

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Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

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