Michelle Malkin
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In 2009, the liberal New Republic published the bodice-ripping "story behind the Obama-Brooks bromance." The magazine reported that "two days after Obama's 'The Audacity of Hope' hit bookstores (in 2006), Brooks published a glowing Times column. The headline was 'Run, Barack, Run.'"

Brooks also recounted his first encounter with his Democratic crush. "I remember distinctly an image of -- we were sitting on his couches, and I was looking at his pant leg and his perfectly creased pant," Brooks said, "and I'm thinking, a) he's going to be president and b) he'll be a very good president."

The purported conservative columnist's public display of affection for the radical Democratic candidate bordered on obscene. "I think he's more talented than anyone in my lifetime," Brooks gushed. "I mean, he is pretty dazzling when he walks into a room." Brooks revealed that he considered Obama's Chicago campaign mastermind David Axelrod a "hero." Axelrod returned the love, calling Brooks a "serious public thinker" in an era of "insipid, instant commentary and one-hour news cycles."

In the fall of 2008, Brooks swooned over Obama's Ivy League "achievatrons" taking over Washington: "Already the culture of the Obama administration is coming into focus. Its members are twice as smart as the poor reporters who have to cover them, three times if you include the columnists. They typically served in the Clinton administration and then, like Cincinnatus, retreated to the comforts of private life -- that is, if Cincinnatus had worked at Goldman Sachs, Williams & Connolly or the Brookings Institution."

Wait, he wasn't not done:

"So many of them send their kids to Georgetown Day School, the posh leftish private school in D.C., that they'll be able to hold White House staff meetings in the carpool line. And yet as much as I want to resent these overeducated Achievatrons (not to mention the incursion of a French-style government dominated by highly trained Enarchs), I find myself tremendously impressed by the Obama transition."

Less than three years later, Brooks acknowledged he had been an "Obama sap." He admitted that he fell for the administration's stimulus propaganda:

"When administration officials called around saying that the possibility of a double-dip recession was horrifyingly real and that it would be irresponsible not to come up with a package that could pass right away, I believed them. ... But of course I'm a sap. When the president unveiled the second half of his stimulus it became clear that this package has nothing to do with helping people right away or averting a double dip. This is a campaign marker, not a jobs bill."

Not just a sap. A willing tool, too. Brooks copped to sitting on Obama's private admission to him that the "shovel-ready" promise was a crock. "The projects just didn't exist. They couldn't do it. They couldn't find them," he said on "PBS NewsHour" -- more than a year after Obama told him.

Gee, Wally, why isn't Eddie Haskell Brooks giving this corrupt administration and its Titanically inept "achievatrons" the business?

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010). Her e-mail address is malkinblog@gmail.com.

COPYRIGHT 2012 CREATORS.COM

Recommend this article

Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

©Creators Syndicate