Michelle Malkin

I remind you that in March, Speaker Mop & Glo was minimizing Rangel's mountain of alleged transgressions by pooh-poohing that "it was a violation of the rules of the House. It was not something that jeopardized our country in any way." GOP Rep. Mike McCaul, a member of the House ethics investigative subcommittee, begged to differ. "Credibility is what's at stake here; the very credibility of the House itself," he said at the hearing announcing the baker's dozen of ethics charges. Echoing Pelosi's nonchalance, Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters sniffed that "many members" of the House are as habitually sloppy and apathetic toward House ethics rules as Rangel -- her good friend and Congressional Black Caucus ally.

Since Day One, the identity-politics caucus that Rangel helped found has stood by his side and blamed anti-black bias for Rangel's troubles. Rangel likened media scrutiny of his shady rent-controlled apartment deals and tax troubles to a "lynching." CBC member Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., called it a "witch hunt." And an unidentified, tinfoil-hatted black House Democrat told Politico: "It looks as if there is somebody out there who understands what the rules (are) and sends names to the ethics committee with the goal of going after the (CBC)."

Never mind that the supposedly bigoted House ethics panel exonerated four CBC members of their participation in corporate-funded tax junkets to the Caribbean. When the polls are down and damning evidence keeps mounting, first yell "BUSH!" Then yell "RAAAAACIST!"

As last-minute deal-making between Rangel and the foxes guarding the congressional henhouse continues, more and more Americans are coming to the same conclusions: House-soilers can't be cleaners. Voters, not Washington politicians, are the ultimate ethics committee.


Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

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