Michelle Malkin

As The Economist put it in an editorial offering praise for the American process: "Money and organisation matter far less than stamina, agility and that most unfakeable of all political attributes, charisma. Anyone deficient will be found out: anyone with the right stuff has a chance to shine."

We may have grown sick and tired of the endless debates and campaign circus, but the process helpfully spotlighted fundamental character flaws. Hillary's botched illegal alien driver's license answer put her open-borders incoherence on full display. Her dumpster-diving into rival Obama's grade-school essays showed her utter pettiness. Iowans -- and the rest of us -- got to see how she and her operatives acted under pressure: by planting questioners, slinging underhanded cocaine references at Obama, and then freezing out the press (including a poor 9-year-old girl who wanted to interview Chelsea Clinton).

I may not agree with the outcomes of the Iowa caucuses (and keep in mind that winning Iowa doesn't guarantee a White House victory). But I much prefer this system to a process that would anoint a deep-pocketed frontrunner allergic to flyover country who wishes he could just phone it in.


Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

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