Michelle Malkin

 This madness would not be as popular as it is among young people if not for the glamorizing endorsement of nitwit celebrities such as twentysomething actress Christina Ricci. Several of the websites I researched highlighted the same quotes from Ricci describing her experiences with self-injury:

 In an Us magazine interview, for example, Ricci blabbed about various scars on her hands and arms: "I wanted to see if I can handle pain. It's sort of an experiment to see if I can handle pain." In another interview, she described putting cigarettes out on her arm and answered questions about whether it hurt: "No. You get this endorphin rush. You can actually faint from pain. It takes a second, a little sting, and then it's like you really don't feel anything. It's calming actually."

 And in Rolling Stone, Ricci prattled about scratching her forearms with her nails and soda can tops: "It's like having a drink. But it's quicker. You know how your brain shuts down from pain? The pain would be so bad, it would force my body to slow down, and I wouldn't be as anxious. It made me calm."

 It may be all fun and games for a Hollywood starlet like Ricci, but her mindless stunts have inspired countless young girls to carve themselves into a bloody stupor. Hollyweird strikes again.


Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

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