Michelle Malkin
Recommend this article

One of the most popular movies currently playing at the box office, "Jeepers Creepers 2," is a teen horror flick directed by a stomach-turning registered sex offender who was convicted of molesting a 12-year-old-boy he targeted, groomed, seduced, and filmed in pornographic home videos.

Hollyweird strikes again.

The celebrity pervert's name is Victor Salva. The scheming Salva wrote children's books, participated in the Big Brother program, and worked at a San Francisco-area daycare center where he met his prey. He molested the victim, Nathan Winters, from the time the boy was 7.

Salva pleaded guilty in 1988 to five felony counts of child sex abuse; he served a measly 15 months of a pathetic three-year prison sentence. Winters' scars will last a lifetime.

Salva made Winters the star of his first feature film, "Clownhouse," a revolting low-budget movie about three murderous clowns who terrorize three young boys. (The movie won praise at Robert Redford's Sundance Film Festival.) While working on the project, Salva forced Winters to perform oral sex on the "critically acclaimed" director and captured the acts on tape. When police raided Salva's home, they found not only the sex videos of Salva and Winters, but also tapes of naked young men taking showers and a pornographic album of still photos.

After he was released on parole, convicted child molester Salva went on to write and direct the "critically acclaimed" 1995 movie "Powder," in which he worked with many young actors. Winters and his mother bravely went public to protest Salva's involvement. But his employers at Disney -- Disney! -- stood by him, as did liberal stars of the film, Mary Steenburgen and Jeff Goldblum. Also a staunch defender and patron of convicted child molester Salva's: director Francis Ford Coppola, whose company produced "Clownhouse" and the two Jeepers Creepers movies.

Convicted child molester Salva's saviors say their "talented" friend has paid his debt to society and should be left alone to express himself creatively and contribute positively to the movie industry. Separate the art from the artist, they preach. Just move on. That is patently impossible and irresponsible, however, when the director's "art" involves the continued sexual exploitation of -- and twisted obsession with -- young boys.

Recommend this article

Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

©Creators Syndicate