Michelle Malkin
Recommend this article
"I want to live. I do not want to die." So spoke an unborn baby to a Massachusetts judge. If only more pro-abortion feminists and politicians would open their deaf ears to the voices of the innocents. Judge Kenneth B. Nasif of the Attleboro Juvenile Court in Bristol County, Mass., told an open courtroom that he heard the fetus in Rebecca Corneau's womb plead with him last week. Corneau is a member of a religious sect that rejects modern medicine and judicial authority. Investigators suspect sect members in the deaths of two babies, including Corneau's infant son. As a pre-emptive measure, Judge Nasif ordered the eight-and-a-half month pregnant woman into state custody for prenatal care until she delivers her second child. The prospect of Big Nanny government forcing expectant moms to receive prenatal care is, of course, scary. Sounding more like ratings-hound Judge Judy than a judge bound by law, Nasif said he was convinced of the moral rightness of his ruling, but admitted ambivalence about the technical and legal soundness of the decision. This rare instance of judicial overreaching on behalf of the unborn has the abortion lobby in a frenzy. What outrages the pro-choicers most about the Corneau case is not that the court forbade a woman from practicing her "faith," but that the judge so openly and honestly challenged their faith -- pro-abortion dogma. Commandment One: Never, ever refer to the fetus in any manner that endows it with human characteristics. "Unwanted uterine material," yes. A being with a wish to live? Blasphemy. Liberal Boston Globe columnist Ellen Goodman dismissed Judge Nasif's expression of compassion for Unborn Baby Corneau as "wacko." Pro-abortion activist Lynn Paltrow of New York derided Nasif's statement as an "auditory hallucination." Hearing a voice from an unseen source may strike these women as crazy. But for most people who've been taught the difference between good and evil, there's another name for having an "auditory hallucination." It's called a conscience. On ABC's "This Week" Sunday talk show, George Stephanopoulos argued smugly that this case "was separate from the abortion debate." But to borrow the pro-abortion punditocracy's pet word, a moral penumbra emanates from the Corneau case that cannot be ignored. Much to the chagrin of those who worship at the altar of "privacy rights" and women's "bodily integrity" over all else, Judge Nasif's ruling sheds light on this society's gross mistreatment of unborn life. We live in a world where it's legal for a woman to choose a doctor to stab her partially delivered fetus in the head, dismember the body, suction out the parts, and throw them in the trash -- but it's a crime for another woman to choose not to have a doctor involved in a pregnancy she plans to carry to term. Doting pet lovers give their cats and dogs antidepressants and antacids and spa treatments. In San Francisco and Boulder, Co., concerned city council members considered action to change all public references of "pet owners" to "pet guardians." Steven Wise, an animal law professor at Harvard, supports "legal personhood" for chimpanzees; the Great Ape Legal Project wants to represent a chimp in court. Animals can get drugs and free legal counsel, but except in rare cases, the courts, Congress and White House refuse to recognize human fetuses as persons with inalienable rights. For three decades, the pro-abortion lobby has succeeded in squelching doubts and dissent about the mass destruction of human lives -- 40 million so far -- in the name of choice. But the truth is seeping out. Ex-abortionists are stepping forward to condemn the procedure. And according to an account in the pro-choice publication American Medical News, clinic workers often wonder if the fetus feels pain: "They talk about the soul and where it goes. And about their dreams, in which aborted fetuses stare at them with ancient eyes and perfectly shaped hands and feet, asking, 'Why? Why did you do this to me?'" Haunting auditory hallucinations. Voices from the womb. This is the pro-abortion movement's worst nightmare. Imagine the roar of 40 million tiny voices, all in unison with Unborn Baby Corneau, crying out: "I want to live. I do not want to die."
Recommend this article

Michelle Malkin

Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regnery 2010).

©Creators Syndicate