Michael Brown

Curitiba questioned why white evangelicals are “still following Ralph Reed when he was exposed profiting off of Abramoff’s forced abortion sweatshops and ripping off the tribes and churches? See a white person gets a pass. White privilege? Most white people are against white privilege.” Stephen asked, “Why would anybody of any minority group stand with the GOP? They are hypocrites and mostly bigots that want minorities to be used as ‘tokens’ advance their agenda, that’s not in the best interest of any minority group. What happened to JC Watts, Allen Keys, Micheal Steele and Colin Powell? Where are they now? You see the GOP doesn’t want any ‘Man of Color’ to lead them.”

Some readers were upset that my previous columns offered tepid support (if that) for Mitt Romney and that I was sympathetic to Christians who would not vote for him because of his Mormon faith. According to Ibay, this was “an awful, terrible admission of moral and political turpitude.”

Sgott claimed: “You are aware that there is a difference between what happens in what the vast majority of us like to call ‘the real world’ and your fantasy evangelical world, where in your fantasy you are some kind of ‘flock leader’ or ‘guider’ or great ‘giver of wisdom’? In ‘the real world’ because of pinheads like you we re-elected the most pro-abortion president in the history of our country. . . . Are you mad?”

Note to Sgott: I wasn’t aware that readers of my articles were my “followers” or that I was their ‘flock leader.’ They will probably be surprised to learn this too. Curt, however, shared similar sentiments: “How dare you claim that you are a leader in a Christen [sic] society while contributing to the demise of the conservative party. You are liar and a deceiver, shame on you.”

Rev. Right agreed with Sgott and Curt: “Dear Mr. Brown, if only you would allow a substantive response to your lying column about ‘only asking,’ a fellow conservative could share the ways in which your implicit assumptions lack theological foundations. What a shame!” (Note the recurring words “lying, liar” and “shame.”)

Rick also does not to appear to be a member of the Michael Brown Fan Club: “Blah, blah, blah. Black Americans voted for Obama because he is black. You call it ‘racial solidarity.’ If white Americans voted for Mitt Romney because he is white, then that’d be racism. I’m guessing that, since you have a radio show and are a contributor to Townhall.com, that you’re one of the smart guys.”

Of course, there were those who really appreciated the article, calling it “a very good column” and a “brilliant article,” telling me the message was “spot on” and “right on time (God’s timing).”

Michael thanked me for “having the guts to hold accountable the black/Latino evangelical community regarding their vote for the pro-abortion candidate in the election. Please do not abandon this issue. No one else has the courage like you! On the other side, please hold the white evangelicals accountable for their utter failure in addressing social justice [in particular, the education of poor minorities]. They have abdicated their responsibility to the poor, focusing only on their own tribe, and giving a godless government control over an issue that the church should be responsible for.”

Likewise, Anastasia, thanked me for “being courageous in being a ‘facilitator’ in this most important issue and topic. As an African American woman, I know firsthand that it is almost impossible to even have this discussion with an African American Christian who voted for President Obama, not once but even twice. . . Please continue this conversation. It is so important and vital to the body of Christ, as well as our nation.”

And since one of my goals was to encourage interaction, this email from Dan, a white Christian, was heartening: “There are often times we conclude someone to be an idiot based on what we perceive the intent of their actions is only to later find out they had good reason to act as they did. I am very curious about what blind spots we as white evangelicals have regarding the GOP. Clearly the strong allegiance to the Democratic Party by black evangelicals has some threads of logic that we are missing. . . . I have been trying to find a black evangelical friend here locally that I could meet with over the next year or so to find out and discuss these blind spots (on both sides but especially those I am missing).”

Let the conversation continue!

Michael Brown

Michael Brown holds a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Literatures from New York University. He is the author of 25 books, including

Can You Be Gay and Christian?

, and he hosts the nationally syndicated, daily talk radio show, the Line of Fire. Follow him at AskDrBrown on Facebook or @drmichaellbrown on Twitter.