Michael Barone

Scott may have been appointed to the Senate. But to win his House seat, he had to win votes from an overwhelmingly white and conservative primary electorate.

In the process, he beat Carroll Campbell III, son of the late Gov. Carroll Campbell Jr., and Paul Thurmond, son of the late Strom Thurmond, who served 48 years in the Senate.

That's the Strom Thurmond who was the States' Rights Democratic Party candidate for president in 1948 and who set the record for longest Senate filibuster when he spoke 24 hours against a civil rights bill in 1957.

Scott is not the first black Republican elected to the House from a majority-non-black district. Gary Franks won such a seat three times in Connecticut in the 1990s, and J.C. Watts won one in Oklahoma between 1994 and 2000. Allen West won a seat in Florida in 2010 but was narrowly defeated for re-election.

Republican primary voters also selected the Hispanic Sen. Marco Rubio in Florida and Sen.-elect Ted Cruz in Texas. They voted for the offspring of immigrants from India, Govs. Bobby Jindal in Louisiana and Nikki Haley in South Carolina.

And of course Barack Obama has now twice been elected president. I think he was helped by widespread feelings that it would be a good thing for Americans to elect a black president and a bad thing to reject him. That's subject to debate, and surely some voters voted against him because of his race.

But on balance we have seen an enormous reduction in racial prejudice and animus in recent generations. Daniel Inouye's death and Tim Scott's appointment remind us that in that important respect it's good we're not the way we were.


Michael Barone

Michael Barone, senior political analyst for The Washington Examiner (www.washingtonexaminer.com), is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a Fox News Channel contributor and a co-author of The Almanac of American Politics. To find out more about Michael Barone, and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. COPYRIGHT 2011 THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER. DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM