Meredith Turney
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In 1955, Walt Disney opened his first amusement park in Anaheim, California. Disneyland has become the most successful amusement park in the world, with an estimated 600 million visitors since it first opened its gates 55 years ago. One of the most popular parts of the park is Fantasyland. Children and adults alike are dazzled by whimsical rides stretching the imagination, envisioning a blissfully perfect world.

Perhaps that’s why fantasy is such an entertaining venture. For just a few moments, we can set aside the troubles and trials of everyday life and visualize things that defy logic or mask the harsh realities of the real world. Unfortunately, California is trying to set up its own Fantasyland outside Disneyland’s walls, passing fantasy-inspired budgets that defy the laws of finance by spending much more than the state can possibly take in. And the Golden State is about to discover that trying to create a fantasy in the real world has devastating consequences.

A recent Los Angeles Times headline says it all: “Californians want it both ways on budget.” A poll conducted by the newspaper found that voters adamantly oppose tax increases to cover the state’s massive $25.4 billion deficit. Instead, they favor cuts to the budget—but not any of the cuts necessary to actually achieve a balanced budget. In fact, voters oppose cuts, and prefer even more spending, on government programs that make up 85% of the state's general budget.

Californians aren’t willing to cut spending on education or healthcare, but they are amenable to cutting the state’s prison system—which makes up just 10% of the overall state budget. Education and healthcare are important, but when it comes right down to it, the ultimate responsibility of government is to execute justice and ensure public safety through keeping criminals off the streets. Californians still living in Fantasyland don’t seem to understand the ramifications of spending all their money on a failing education system and healthcare benefits at the expense of protecting the public.

The current state deficit doesn’t even take into account the pension tsunami that threatens to wipe out taxpayers. California’s pension liability is estimated to be in excess of $500 billion. A recent study by the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research found that local governments’ employment pension plans are underfunded by $200 billion.

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Meredith Turney

Meredith Turney is a conservative political commentator, writer and new media consultant.More of her work can be found at MeredithTurney.com.