Matt Barber

Indeed, his own words knocked him to the canvas, but, unlike the boxing ring, it seems a scant few have failed to kick him while he was down. The “progressive” juggernaut pounced like Elizabeth Warren on a half-priced headdress, while a bevy of weak-kneed Republicans (who needs enemies …) began pressuring him to stay down.

And stay down he did.

For about seven seconds.

Whether his ongoing trials will be “sweet to recall” remains to be seen, but this much is true: When he had to decide whether to get off the canvas and fight, or wait-out the ten-count, Todd Akin chose to fight.

I admire a fighter. I think most do. I admire someone who’s told he can’t do something and then, rather than giving up, takes it as a direct challenge to prove that he can. I admire Todd Akin. He’s a fighter.

But he’s also, as liberals love to say, a champion “for the little guy.”

I’m reminded of an incident several years ago. There was some poor sap who worked for a major company in the Midwest. On his own time, on his home computer, he wrote an article for a conservative website that defended the sanctity of natural marriage.

When the company got wind of the article, it fired him.

Somehow, word of the incident made its way to Washington, D.C., through the halls of Congress and into the offices of one U.S. congressman from Missouri. Todd Akin, with no apparent prompting, then wrote a letter to the CEO of that company defending the fired employee’s free-speech rights. The letter was signed by a total of eight U.S. representatives and mailed.

Ultimately, the company ended up settling out of court with the former employee. There can be little doubt that Todd Akin’s unsolicited intervention led to that settlement.

This is one of the primary reasons I have such high regard for Todd Akin. You see, in case you’ve yet to figure it out, I’m the aforementioned “poor sap.”

Who was I?

Nobody.

Yet a powerful U.S. congressman representing the greatest nation on earth took the time to come to the aid of one of the little guys, someone he’d never even met, someone who didn’t even hail from his home state.

It didn’t matter. He saw a wrong that need righting, and so he righted it. He stepped up.

Isn’t it time we begin placing people of character, true leaders and true statesmen in a U.S. Congress full of politicians?

Todd Akin is a man of character, a true leader and true a statesman.

They call Missouri the “Show-Me State.” Rep. Akin’s support during a tough time for me and my young family, his unblemished conservative record and his fearless determination to do what God has called him to do despite tremendous pressure to stay down, has shown me everything I ever needed to know about him.

I hope it has shown you something, too.


Matt Barber

Matt Barber is founder and editor-in chief of BarbWire.com. He is an author, columnist, cultural analyst and an attorney concentrating in constitutional law. Having retired as an undefeated heavyweight professional boxer, Matt has taken his fight from the ring to the culture war. (Follow Matt on Twitter: @jmattbarber).