Marybeth Hicks

If you choose to opt your child out of sex education classes, don’t make a fuss about it; just opt out. Either arrange for your student to spend that class time in the library (Reading age appropriate books! What a concept!), or pick her up from school and do an impromptu math lesson comparing the prices of various sizes of ice cream cones. Having talked to the teacher in advance about your decision, it should be easy to facilitate removing your child from the class without fear of retribution. If you’re concerned about missing associated assignments, you and the teacher can come to an agreement about an alternative assignment that will count for school credit.

Unfortunately, many districts now are teaching what is essentially sexual material in the context of school safety seminars, as opposed to health classes, because they’re including information about homosexuality in their anti-bullying efforts. Parents have much less leeway to opt their children out of school safety seminars, so make sure you discuss this with your school administrators.

Generally, I think it’s sad that the culture is so sexed-up that our nation’s children are forced to engage in classroom discussions about issues beyond their interest and maturity. It undermines the role of parents when the school imposes its cultural morality, irrespective of families’ beliefs. But well-informed and engaged parents can protect their children’s innocence by knowing and exercising their rights. Have a question about parenting in today’s culture?


Marybeth Hicks

Marybeth Hicks is the author of Don't Let the Kids Drink the Kool-Aid: Confronting the Left's Assault on Our Families, Faith, and Freedom (Regnery Publishers, 2011).