Marybeth Hicks

Obviously, Louisiana isn't looking at this as a collection problem. If it were, it would have instituted any number of convenient ways to automatically collect funds from non-paying parents, such as a school-based debit account, or a payment program that charges lunches to a credit card.

The point is it's not about the money. It's about getting into people's homes and evaluating their parenting skills, and then imposing government control on parents and their children.

In a news article, the communications director for Gov. Bobby Jindal was quoted as saying, "The intention of this bill is to ensure that children are not denied meals while at school. However, the part of this bill that includes reporting to [Department of Social Services] needs to be amended to line up with current law, which mandates school administrators to specifically report cases of child abuse or neglect."

Reporting parents to the government for possibly neglecting their children is a serious and extreme step, and not one that ought to be triggered by delinquent lunch money.

Because the next step will be to open those brown paper sacks some of us are sending from home to decide, based on what's in them, who else ought to get a call from the government.


Marybeth Hicks

Marybeth Hicks is the author of Don't Let the Kids Drink the Kool-Aid: Confronting the Left's Assault on Our Families, Faith, and Freedom (Regnery Publishers, 2011).