Marybeth Hicks

And just what are those? Well, for starters, she is an outspoken apologist for terrorists who employ suicide bombings to kill innocent civilians and advance their ideological pursuits.

You'll be amazed to discover, though, just how jaunty a tune you can produce while singing about such gruesome themes. This summer, with the release of her latest album, "Maya," fans can get out the disco ball and bust a move to "Lovealot" while singing along with these lyrics:

Like a Taliban trucker eatin’ boiled-up yucca,
Get my eyes done like I’m in a black burka,
Been through s--t, yeah it's a f---a',
But now I make tunes, say shuck-a-lucka-lucka.

I fight the ones that fight me.
I really love a lot, I really love a lot.
I really love a lot, I really love a lot.

Cleaver artist that she is, Maya drops the letter "t" at the end of the words "a lot," as Brits often do, so that the chorus sounds just like "I really love Allah."

Such a great follow up to her ironic (and nauseatingly violent) "Born Free," whose music video features a paramilitary unit wearing American flag badges chasing a busload of red headed boys and young men across a desert and ultimately murdering them.

You can watch that video on YouTube.com, and you should, because your teenager probably already has.

Rocketing to success in only six years, Maya’s fame and fortune have produced predictable results. She's engaged to an American millionaire, Seagram's heir Ben Bronfman, and along with their 1-year-old son, the couple live in the wealthy enclave of Brentwood, Calif., far from the threat of those suicide bombers she so admires.

In our free country, Maya may pollute the culture with deranged drivel such as this.

But savvy parents ought to apply skills of media literacy and talk to their kids about the messages this "artist" freely conveys to the young people who are simply singing along.


Marybeth Hicks

Marybeth Hicks is the author of Don't Let the Kids Drink the Kool-Aid: Confronting the Left's Assault on Our Families, Faith, and Freedom (Regnery Publishers, 2011).